Participatory Culture: This is how it works

23 10 2009

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SCROLL TO BOTTOM VIDEO TO PAUSE!!!!

Above: A screen shot of live class small group discussion, Full Sail University, 10/21/09.  Attendees video conference while in their respective homes in Florida, New York, Tennessee, Costa Rica, and Colorado.

Thanks for a great class this month Joe Bustillos!  With my blog starting to become a part of my day-to-day life… the networks are still increasing.  My level of participation through uploads and shared links with the web family, continue to open new possibilities.  From one teacher to another, the ripple effect sends waves across oceans even seas you never travel yourself…

My first video and my first video response.  It’s fun taking risks… and now our discussion goes down in the books…Thanks for participating in the discussion.  I love your take on the BLING-BLING CHA -CHING-CHING of copyright law…  funny because it’s true, sad all the same.  Maybe I’m the old man sitting around the camp fire trying to hold on to some ounce of our folklore.  You can call me old fashion if you will.  If users can’t own this material, the government has a responsibility to preserve, protect, and defend it for the general public then.  Common good prevails.  For those who didn’t get a chance to experience Prof’s video response, here you go.

The original discussion comes in the first two shots, then you see my Professor, Joe Bustillo’s response to my comments…

My response …

Finally, Profe Joe’s response …

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Sources:
* Eyes on the Fair Use of the Prize directed and produced by Jacob Caggiano/Center for Social Media, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r0pM1hJGU8 retrieved on 10/22/2009

* Save the Prize by Seann Goodman/OnOttButton, article at https://seanngoodman.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/save-the-prize/, video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8fvmpRtDb0 retrieved on 10/22/2009.

* Save the Prize – Cha-Ching Version by Joe Bustillos,article at  http://www.viddler.com/explore/joebeebee/videos/17/ retrieved on 10/22/2009.
*”Lumbering through life.” Joe Bustillos.  2009. Retrieved on 10/22/2009.   http://joebustillos.com/2009/10/22/save-the-prize-cha-ching-version/




Give the kid your cellphone number!

22 10 2009

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Most people would consider giving students your cell phone number an easy open door for students to enter and mess with your private life.  Why would any teacher in their right mind encourage phone calls from their students?  Isn’t it a little idealist to think that teenagers won’t abuse your privacy?

These questions certainly raise a lot of fear for many.  Those unfamiliar with the practice of increased connectivity see their lives as over whelmed already.  No wonder then that those teachers complain about their contract hours for work and pay, feel no obligation to reach students outside of the normal contract hours.  One teacher recently said, “that’s nice to give up your family and home time to your students, but what’s next, charging for contact time outside of the normal office hours like lawyers do?”

These same fears are what limit the capacity of education to move at the speed of 21st Century professionals in the free market.  Most teachers in fact don’t feel connected what so ever to the free market and this may truthfully be the key.  Teachers are very concerned these days about test scores and a Darwinian way of educating.  This could be seen as market driven but the reality is that this lessens motivation, engagement, and relationships.  In order for education to move into a new paradigm and in order to prepare our students for the work place demand of jobs yet to be created, teachers themselves need to think like those who work in the market.

In the 1990’s increased productivity brought the stock market to new highs.  Whatever, whenever, wherever technologies allowed huge growth to translate into huge profits.  Multitasking and collaborative efforts lead to more transmission of content knowledge and on wider spread platforms.  Increased connectivity leads to better students, with deeper knowledge, and problem solvers ready at all times for any challenge.  President Obama even announced that teaching contact days should be increased and a move to year round schools would benefit students’ nation wide.  This is increased connectivity.  Teachers must learn from this.

Plans to spur learning are already under way.  Across the nation pioneers still exist.  Many of these pioneers are being armed with the latest tools of human gadgetry are displaying these ideas not in the boardroom but in the classroom.  These teachers are realizing the potential of increased literacy based around a new ideal of literacy where media is seen as a guide to open up the ears, eyes, and souls of students.  The written word is considered as valuable as ever.  More important than test scores, students and teachers are working together to build relationships with a shared vision and understanding.  Compassion and open communication are allowing for a new understanding of a Global community based around democracy and user filtered content.  For those teachers willing to think like a businessman, there is a whole world of wealth and knowledge being explored.  When teachers allow students to call them or instant message them about a homework problem, contact time increases, student productivity is ensured, and relationships are fastened.





Scratch…much more than two turntables and a microphone…

19 10 2009

Mike Wiseangst posted this video and comments regarding Scratch and Logo.  The possibilities of Scratch will lead teachers and students to create better, more captivating ideas while learning root problem solving skills.  No longer is scratching something for DJs to do with vinyl records.  Students are already Scratching animations, presentations, prototypes, and games.  Check it out…

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http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/03/scratch-lowers/

http://scratch.mit.edu/





Save the Prize

16 10 2009




Can’t make them passive, can only make them pirates.

16 10 2009

“-they’ve been there before — but they aren’t going to stop creating.”

-Henery Jenkins

“Corporations have a right to keep copyright but they have an interest in releasing it.”

-Henry Jenkins

Convergence culture has no better friend than George Lucas.  Think the relationship of convergence media was good only for pop culture.  Fair use and collaborators are continuing to sell the Lucas trademark Star Wars films in ways that Lucas nor his high paid Hollywood allies ever dreamed.  In return, the fans have gained a generation worth of myths and tales (Jenkins, 2006).  This is a culture where everyone wins.  New and emerging artist take their stab at telling their own tales using the Lucas fantasy.  These new editors and filmmakers, armed with tools like Youtube and today’s wide range of cameras and editing software, now participate with an audience, engaged and interactive.  These are today’s storytellers communicating in creative voice to spread previous fantasies and myths of heroes and villains.  These new films push the original ideas into a new realm of interaction and engagement.  Communities of filmmakers learn from watching each other and furthering their own skills.

DJ’s have understood this since the 70’s when they started sampling beats, scratching records, and using vocals tracks to create what is hip-hop.  The original mash up culture may in fact be hip-hop.  The very nature of the DJ, MC, Break Dancers and graffiti artwork all feed off each other in a participatory fashion.  These elements started in the underground and drove quickly to the top.  Bringing with it, hip-hop inspired millions world wide, gave a voice to people of all types, and made billions of dollars in music sales, concerts, fashion, and film.   Even though people thought hip-hop would be a quick fad, it is here to stay 30 years later.  Suppose we criminalize hip-hop.   Would it go quietly back underground?

If societies are to progress, freedom has to be guarded.  The mind develops a memory of the tales of our time.  Once the tales begin to guide us, they cannot leave the psyche.  In the same way, though copyright exists to protect investment and self-preservation, it should not exist to limit the tales we tell or the way in which we tell them.  Nor will it ever be able to stop the new media entrepreneurs from building on solid foundations.  Collaborators will not be prohibited.   Literacy is advancing.  The forms in which our stories exist are being reinvented everyday.  There are no new stories, only new ways of telling them.  The people are speaking and speaking to audiences like never before.  The evolution of democracy is happening.  Billy Joel put it best, “We didn’t start the fire, it was always burning, since the world’s been turning.”

Reference:

Jenkins, Henry.  2006.  Convergence Culture.  New York.  New York University Press.





Channel 21st Century Classroom

7 10 2009

Was it only four short years ago that the world was introduced to what is now the most popular media viewing platform, YouTube?  Indeed, it is hard to imagine what life was like before all the emails being sent from friend to friend with the latest laugh reel on YouTube.  With an endless number af channels to choose from and a production staff from all corners of the world, YouTube is reshaping the media’s world in unimaginable ways.  MTV’s early days could easily be compared to YouTube’s own introduction to the media world.  Both have reshaped the media industry.  However, only YouTube is giving teachers a resource worth using in the classroom.

Teachers are now finding just the exact teachable short clip to full documentary to use with students.  In the past month I have shown numerous clips from YouTube channels.  My students are seeing short five minute clips to help effect the lesson or they are watching hour long pieces that would normally cost me countless dollars to purchase the films.  In the past I might have to search out for licensing rights and public relations folks to access major corporate films.  Now, I can access many Discovery Channel, National Geographic, or PBS series’ to bring in to the classroom.  Every subject across every lesson plan can be enhanced through a simple YouTube search.  Students are even finding ways to spread their message through YouTube.

As students learn to develope and play with new media they are excited to publish their own work.  YouTube is giving students public access channels which in the past might mean huge corporate funding or extensive grant writing.  Today, we can implement student news media networks for free and from any computer.  For my students, this means active engagement in their own learning.  Alternative media is allowing students to network within the school and even throughout the community.  With a small cheap video camera and simple editing tools, students are engaged in the uploading process of YouTube in addition to the countless pieces they watch.

Leadership students in my class are utilizing both YouTube and Facebook to spread the word about homecoming this year.  Here is the first YouTube my students deigned, constructed, and shared with the school and the community.  My role was simply a consultant and advisor.  The rest of the work is their own creation.